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Rockin' Ramrods - Puff

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This is some information I found about The Rockin' Ramrods and Puff off of a Russian blog.  I thought it was pretty interesting.  

Biography by Richie Unterberger

Along with the Remains, the Rockin' Ramrods were Boston's premier rock band in the mid-'60s. Unlike the Remains, they didn't gain even a modicum of exposure beyond their city, and are far more obscure even to '60s collectors. They were a decent if not significant group, sounding kind of like a Beatlized frat band, and relying largely upon original material, much of it penned by bassist Ronn Campisi. Over the course of more than half a dozen singles between 1963 and
1966, they competently tackled garage grunge, wild instrumentals, and some very pleasant hard pop/rock originals with prominent keyboards, somewhat in the manner of an Americanized early Manfred Mann. "Bright Lit Blues Skies," their best song, was a hit in the Boston area, but they achieved no other success of note before disbanding.
*****
1.JUNGLE CALL 
2. I WANNA BE YOUR MAN 
3. I'LL BE ON MY WAY 
4. DON'T FOOL WITH FU MANCHU
5. TEARS MELT THE STONE 
6. PLAY IT
7. BRIGHT LIT BLUE SKIES
8. MISTER WIND
9. CAN'T YOU SEE 
10. MARY, MARY
11. FLOWERS IN MY MIND [Puff]
12. VACUUM 
13. TREES
14. RAINY DAY 
15. LOOKING IN MY WINDOW
16. WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE 
17. OF NOT BEING ABLE TO SLEEP 
18. I SURE NEED YOU 
19. DEAD THOUGHTS OF ALBERT 
20. WHEN I WAKE UP IN THE MORNING 
21. GO WITH YOU 
22. CHANGES [Ramrods '71] 
23. MY VISION HAS CLEARED
24. I DON'T WANT TO I WILL
25. TROUBLES
******
Review by Richie Unterberger

A strange compilation that spans several stages of the group's evolution. There are eleven songs (one previously unreleased) from their mid-'60s prime, presented in much better sound than on the Eva reissue, but six of the songs from the eight singles they recorded during this time are missing. Then there are eleven tracks (one previously unreleased) from the obscure 1968 MGM
recording by Puff, a spinoff group that did not feature Ramrods
leader/singer/songwriter Ronn Campisi, although, oddly, he wrote all of the material. The Puff cuts are light, sophisticated pop/rock with lots of harmonies and slight psychedelic touches; mildly interesting, it's much less hard-rocking than the other "Bosstown" groups MGM was giving a big push to in 1968. The CD finishes with three unreleased songs recorded by a 1971 incarnation of The
Ramrods. A wealth of genuine Rockin' Ramrods unreleased material from their 1966-67 prime that has circulated among a few '60s/garage collectors was not tapped at all. Though less comprehensive, much harder to find, and of lower fidelity, the French import on Eva -- which includes both sides of every one of
their eight early singles -- still gets the nod over this less cohesive batch.

You can buy the tracks off of the Puff record at emusic.com.  They were made available not too long ago.

Chico introduced Doug Kupper to a lot of the musicians that were part of a marketing push called "The Boston Sound". Doug stated "Basically it was one record company that needed to spend some money, so they spread it around Boston without doing much to promote the acts or the product.  It did, however, give a lot of hometown groups a chance to record in those heady days and Puff was one of them."

Len Cirelli's memories of Chico -

I cannot remember exact dates but it must have been around 1966-67. The Ramrods were touring a lot and on the road more and the Surf Ballroom, our home base, needed new house bands. We held auditions at the Surf and The Ramrods were the judges. That was the first time I saw Dave. He was playing bass in a group, I cannot remember the name, and he really impressed us. Dave was one of those people that may seem average to you at first but put a bass in his hands and it all changes. I believe we hired that band to play at the Surf at least once or twice. It was very obvious to us that Dave was the talent in the band.
After we got back from the Stones tour, our bass player Ronnie decided to leave. He still wanted to write songs and produce but did not want to play. We remembered Dave and although we listened to a few other bass players, Dave was the guy we really wanted and at some point we brought him into the group.
Things really changed after Ronnie left. Although Dave brought new and exciting energy to the Ramrods, and new fans also, Ronnie was the leader of the group. I hate to admit it but after he left it was never the same.
Dave fit right in and was a lot of fun. I remember him coming over to my house and my mom feeding us (she is still alive and is 100 years old and going strong). The fans loved him and as I said he brought a lot of talent and ideas with him.
I will never forget a trip to New York City that Dave and I, and our roadie Buzzy took. We went to a club to see a group called "The British ModBeats" and were just knocked out with the Beatle type look. But then they introduced this guy who came out and sang Secret Angent Man in a high and low voice. Believe it or not he was SO good. You will never guess but it was an unknown Tiny Tim who no one knew at the time. With his pale face and ukeleyie he was something to see. We had some much fun that weekend. I will never forget it. We spent every dime we had and could barely pay our hotel bill.
Dave continued to bring good things to the Ramrods and never ever grew tired of playing. I was getting older and realized if we had not made it after all the good press we got on the Stones tour, we were not going to make it. Also after Ronnie left we could not agree on anything. I had planned to start a new group but marriage and kids put that away for good.
The last time I played professionally was with Dave and Sha Na Na at the Surf. All of the old crowd and fans showed up and it was a magical night. I never played professionally again.
Dave would show up at my house from time to time with a different girl on his arm. I remember one Japanese girl who was absolutely beautiful. He kept in touch and of course I would see him on tv but soon we lost contact. When I saw his death notice in the paper, I could not believe it. So much talent to leave behind. I did not know Dave's family and I did not know until he passed away that he was married.
I guess what I remember the most about Dave was his ability to have a lot of fun on stage and bring the audience along with him. You never had a "bad " gig when Dave was on stage. I think of Dave often and of course I feel bad we did not stay in contact but I know he had the same fun memories that I do. I wish I could tell you more but that is all I can recall at this time. I am very proud to have known Dave and be a very small part of Rock and Roll history.
Len